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How Do I Transition to Viscosity from Tunnelblick?
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How Do I Find Out Who My VPN Provider Is?
Why Does Viscosity Ask For My Password the First Time I Use It?

 

How Do I Find Out Who My VPN Provider Is?
Knowledge Base > Common Questions > How Do I Find Out Who My VPN Provider Is?


Viscosity is software that allows you to connect to a VPN server running OpenVPN. However Viscosity itself is not your VPN provider, rather it allows you to connect to a VPN provider. Your VPN provider may be a third party VPN Service provider, your workplace, or a VPN server you have setup yourself.

A number of third party VPN Service providers bundle Viscosity to their Mac users as part of their service. This makes for a much simpler and seamless setup experience for first time VPN users, however it can sometimes lead to a mistake in thinking that Viscosity is the VPN Service, when in fact it's just the software that allows you to connect.

Your VPN Provider

Viscosity allows you to connect to any VPN server that supports the OpenVPN protocol. Viscosity is only one end of the VPN connection: your VPN provider provides the other end of the connection (the server you wish to connect to). Your VPN Provider is the person or company who controls this server.

Typically your VPN provider falls into one of the following categories:

  • Workplace: Your workplace may provide a VPN server so you can remotely and securely access the work network and Internet. In most cases the person to contact for more information or connection details would be your IT/System Administrator.
  • VPN Service: Many third party companies specialize in offering both free and paid VPN services to users. There are a number of reasons why you may want to subscribe to a VPN Service, including protecting your privacy and security while on public networks, accessing location restricted websites, and accessing blocked content due to restrictive censorship. Most VPN Service providers provide a webpage or support site where you can obtain connection details. A list of VPN providers with Viscosity setup guides can be on our VPN Service Providers page.
  • Personal: If you are familiar with VPNs you may have setup your own OpenVPN server so you can access your home network, and/or to have the same benefits as using a VPN Service Provider.

It is important to identify who your VPN provider is and obtain the details you need to setup your connection. Your VPN provider may provide you with the settings and files you need to manually enter into Viscosity, or a configuration file Viscosity can automatically import.

Identifying A VPN Service Provider

If your VPN is provided by a VPN Service provider (see above), and you are unsure of who this may be, there are two ways you can identify who your provider may be:

  • Registration Name: Many VPN Service providers who bundle Viscosity with their service register it under their name. If this is the case, you can identify your VPN Service provider's name by opening Viscosity's Preferences window, clicking on the About toolbar icon, and view the "Registered To" name located at in the top right-hand corner of the window.
  • Server Address: If Viscosity is registered under your name, or otherwise not your VPN Service provider's name, you may be able to identify your VPN Service provider by the Remote Server Address for your connection. For example, an address of "vpn.myprovider.com" may indicate your VPN provider's name is "MyProvider", with a website located at "myprovider.com".

    You can view the Remote Server Address for your connection by opening Viscosity's Preferences window, double-clicking on your connection to edit it, and then viewing the address in the Remote Server Address field.

In most instances you should get in contact with your VPN Service provider if you are unable to connect to their servers.




 
 
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